How To Survive the Chairlift – Beginner Snowboarding

How To Survive the Chairlift – Beginner Snowboarding

In the video “How To Survive the Chairlift – Beginner Snowboarding” by SnowboardProCamp, the host shares some valuable tips for successfully navigating the chairlift on a snowboard. Before attempting the chairlift, it is important to practice one footed skating and stopping, as this will not only help you reach the chair, but also get off safely. Observing others get on the chairlift beforehand is also a good idea to gain a better understanding of the process. Once at the front of the line, follow the chair as it passes in front of you, then sit down with your snowboard still on the snow. Remember to always pull the safety bar down for added safety. While on the chairlift, you can rest your snowboard on your free foot for comfort. When nearing the top, prepare by lifting the bar up, sitting slightly sideways, and getting ready for the ground to come to your snowboard. Finally, stand up and snowboard straight with one foot until you’re ready to stop by dragging your toe in the snow. For more beginner snowboarding tips, check out the beginner snowboarding playlist.

Preparing for the Chairlift

Practice one footed skating

Before attempting to ride the chairlift, it is crucial for beginners to spend time practicing one footed skating. This skill is important not only for getting to the chairlift but also for getting off of it. To practice one footed skating, find a small hill that flattens out where you can ride down with one foot. Spend at least 20 minutes practicing riding and stopping with just one foot. This can be done by dragging your toe or heel in the snow. The goal is to feel confident and comfortable with this skill before moving on to the next step.

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Practice one footed stopping

In addition to practicing one footed skating, beginners should also spend time practicing one footed stopping. This skill is essential for safely getting off the chairlift. Practice dragging your toe or heel in the snow to come to a stop while riding with one foot. By practicing this maneuver, you will feel more prepared and confident when it comes time to get off the chairlift.

Observing Others

Watch others get on the chairlift

Before getting on the chairlift yourself, take some time to observe others. Watch how they approach the chairlift, how they position themselves, and how they get on and off. This will give you a good idea of what to expect and can help ease any anxiety or uncertainty you may have. By observing others, you can learn from their actions and apply those lessons when it’s your turn.

Observe what to expect

Observing others also allows you to familiarize yourself with the process of getting on and off the chairlift. Pay attention to how people position themselves, how they hold their snowboard, and how they interact with the safety bar. By observing what to expect, you can mentally prepare yourself and feel more confident when it’s your turn to ride the chairlift.

How To Survive the Chairlift - Beginner Snowboarding

Getting On the Chairlift

Follow the chair up to the loading line

When you get to the front of the chairlift line, follow the chair as it passes in front of you. Keep your eyes on the chair and follow its path up to the loading line. This will ensure that you are in the correct position when the chairlift comes behind you.

Rest your snowboard on your free foot

To make the ride more comfortable, rest your snowboard on your free foot once the chairlift comes behind you. This will prevent your leg from getting sore due to the weight of the snowboard hanging off it throughout the lift. By resting your snowboard on your free foot, you can relax and enjoy the ride up the mountain.

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Pull down the safety bar

For safety reasons, it is important to always pull down the safety bar once you are seated on the chairlift. This bar provides an extra layer of protection and security during the ride. Before pulling down the bar, make sure to inform the other riders on the chairlift so that they are aware of your actions.

Riding the Chairlift

Rest your snowboard on your free foot

While riding the chairlift, it is still recommended to rest your snowboard on your free foot for added comfort. This will prevent any strain or discomfort in your leg. By resting your snowboard on your free foot, you can relax and enjoy the scenic ride up the mountain.

Inform others before pulling down the bar

Before pulling down the safety bar, it is essential to inform the other people on the chairlift. This communication ensures that everyone is prepared and can adjust themselves accordingly. By informing others before pulling down the bar, you can avoid any accidents or injuries.

Preparing to Get Off the Chairlift

Get ready by sitting sideways

As you approach the top of the chairlift, get ready by sitting a bit sideways. This position will help you transition smoothly from the chairlift to the snow. By sitting sideways, you will be in the optimal position to dismount the chairlift.

Lift the restraining bar up

When you are close to the top and ready to get off the chairlift, lift the restraining bar up. This will signal that you are preparing to exit the chairlift. By lifting the bar up, you are ensuring that it is out of the way and won’t obstruct your path when getting off.

Getting Off the Chairlift

Stand up and snowboard straight

Once the ground comes up to your feet, stand up while snowboarding straight. Keep your balance and maintain control as you descend from the chairlift. By standing up and snowboarding straight, you will have a smooth and controlled exit from the chairlift.

Drag your toe in the snow to stop

When you are ready to stop, drag your toe in the snow. This will help slow down your speed and come to a complete stop. By dragging your toe in the snow, you can safely and confidently exit the area near the chairlift.

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Tips for a Successful Chairlift Experience

Find a small hill to practice one footed riding

To prepare for the chairlift, find a small hill that allows you to practice one footed riding. This will help build your confidence and skills before attempting the chairlift. Look for a hill that is mellow and flattens out, as this will provide an ideal practice area.

Spend at least 20 minutes practicing one footed riding and stopping

To ensure that you feel comfortable and confident, dedicate at least 20 minutes to practicing one footed riding and stopping. This time investment will pay off when you are on the chairlift. By practicing these skills, you will build muscle memory and improve your overall snowboarding ability.

Take the time to observe others before getting on the chairlift

Before getting on the chairlift yourself, take the time to observe others. Watch how they position themselves, how they hold their snowboard, and how they interact with the safety bar. This observation will give you a better understanding of what to expect and how to navigate the chairlift successfully.

Rest your snowboard on your free foot for comfort while riding

Throughout the chairlift ride, rest your snowboard on your free foot for added comfort. This simple adjustment can help prevent any discomfort or strain in your leg. By resting your snowboard on your free foot, you can fully enjoy the ride up the mountain.

Always pull down the safety bar for safety

Prioritize safety by always pulling down the safety bar once seated on the chairlift. This precautionary measure provides added security during the ride. Make sure to inform the other riders on the chairlift about your intentions before pulling down the bar.

Inform others before pulling down the bar

To ensure the safety and comfort of everyone on the chairlift, inform the other riders before pulling down the safety bar. This courtesy allows others to adjust their positions and prepare for the descent. By communicating your actions, you can prevent any unexpected accidents or injuries.

Get ready by sitting sideways and lifting the restraining bar when close to the top

As you approach the top of the chairlift, get ready by sitting sideways. This position will facilitate a smooth and controlled exit from the chairlift. Additionally, lift the restraining bar up when you are close to the top to signal your intention to disembark.

Stand up and snowboard straight until ready to stop

Once you have exited the chairlift, stand up and snowboard straight until you are ready to stop. This technique allows you to maintain control and balance as you descend from the chairlift. By snowboarding straight, you can confidently navigate the area until you’re prepared to stop.

Check out the beginner snowboarding playlist for more tips

For additional tips and guidance on your first day of snowboarding, check out the beginner snowboarding playlist. This resource provides valuable information and techniques to help you have an enjoyable and successful experience on the slopes.

Conclusion

Surviving the chairlift is an important skill for beginner snowboarders. By practicing one footed skating and stopping, observing others, and following the recommended steps, you can confidently navigate the chairlift with ease. Remember to always prioritize safety by pulling down the safety bar and informing others. With these tips in mind, you’ll be able to conquer the chairlift on your snowboard and fully enjoy your snowboarding adventure.

Hi there, I'm Jesse Hull, the author behind AK Fresh Pow. "Shred The Knar There Bud" is not only our tagline, but also our way of life. As a Husband and Father, I embrace the thrill of conquering the slopes. Being a retired Infantry Paratrooper has taught me discipline and a love for adventure. Now, as a new snowboarder/skier, I'm embracing the freedom and adrenaline rush that comes with it. Alongside these passions, I am a full-time student at Alaska Pacific University in Anchorage, Alaska, continuously expanding my knowledge and skills. Join me on this exciting journey as we explore the beauty of the snowy mountains together.